Sand Dollar

Sand Dollars

The sun-bleached skeletons we know them by represent a strange‚ simple life By Candice Dyer S and dollars have more in common with people than you might think. Scientists have discovered that the genomes of humans and sea urchins bear notable similarities; they’re our closer…

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Bottlenose Dolphins

Bottlenose Dolphins

The world’s most abundant marine mammal puts on a lively show around Jekyll By Candice Dyer B ottlenose dolphins have upturned mouths beneath their outsize snouts, giving them a perpetual grin befitting their collegiality. These marine mammals socialize in small, ever-changing groups, but they demonstrate…

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Where to Bird Watch

Break out the binoculars—or just sit and take it all in—at one of these birding hot spots. Amphitheater Area Located behind the fire station near the historic district, the old amphitheater is off the beaten path and no longer used for entertainment, but the resident…

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Sandhill Crane

For The Birds

A close-up of the winged wonders that sweep through this barrier island each year—and the people who flock to them. By Margaret Evans Illustrated by Helen Seay Birders are a curious breed. Even the most practical and science-minded among them seem vaguely possessed; they exude…

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Diamondback Terrapin

Diamondback Terrapin

This gem of a reptile gets a protective boost from the Georgia Sea Turtle Center By Candice Dyer The diamondback terrapin derives its name from the angular, faceted designs on its shell—but don’t expect to see much family resemblance among them. “Each terrapin has a…

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Shark Eyes

Shark Eyes

Shark eyes are members of the moon snail family. These predators plow through the sand just below the low tide line in search of coquina clams and smaller snails to eat. They drill holes in the shells of their victims, secrete an acid into the shell, then pierce the shell with their toothed tongues!

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Wilson's Plover Chick

Wilson’s plover hatchlings

Spotted: Our first Wilson’s plover hatchlings of 2018 have arrived! These baby birds were banded by the Jekyll Island Conservation team and placed back in the sand with mom and dad. They’ll remain in the nest for about 30 days or so, before heading off…

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American Alligator

American alligators

Did you know Jekyll Island is home to American alligators? These reptiles can be seen on the golf courses or from viewing platforms, like Horton Pond.

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American Mink

American Mink

The strange and elusive animal leaves its footprints on Jekyll Island By Candice Dyer A mink is astoundingly short, standing around two or three inches tall and weighing only a couple of pounds. But what it lacks in height, it makes up for with lithe,…

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Roseate Spoonbill

Roseate Spoonbill

Meet the island’s resident pop of color By Candice Dyer That flash of bismuth pink you see hovering over the marsh may look, at first glance, like a flamingo, but zoom in with your binoculars. It is actually a roseate spoonbill. The spoonbill is smaller…

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American Alligator

The American Alligator

There’s a tender heart beneath the tough hide By Candice Dyer To detractors of alligators, Gatorology 101—a forty-five-minute interactive class at Jekyll’s Horton Pond—offers some snappy comebacks. The creatures’ ancient physiques link us to the dinosaur age; they play an essential role in the ecosystem…

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