Jul
22
Team Sea Watch

Team Sea Watch Cooks Again!

Tom Kent and Pat Cochran have been cooking together since they were in college over 40 years ago.  Many dishes have been prepared while on vacations and getaways over the years and some were created on sailboats off the coast of British Columbia, Maine, and in the Virgin Islands.  Team Sea Watch entered Jekyll Shrimp and Grits in 2013 for the first time finishing second. Tom and Pat share a love for Jekyll Island and the Georgia coast.  Tom lives in Atlanta and has been visiting Jekyll for over 30 years including many Rotary District Conference meetings.  Pat lives in Valdosta.  He vacationed at Jekyll as a child with his family and now owns a second home on Jekyll named “Sea Watch” which was purchased after he was married here several years ago.  They have introduced many friends to the treasures of the Georgia Coast over the years including many Low Country Boil dinners with Wild Georgia Shrimp.  Look for this fun duo at our Wild Georgia Shrimp and Grits festival September 19 – 21st. www.jekyllisland.com/shrimp-and-grits

Jul
21

Sea Turtle Release this Friday at 10:30 a.m.

 

 Public Invited to Attend! Join Us!

WHO:                   Jekyll Island Authority – Georgia Sea Turtle Center

WHAT:                Sea Turtle Release

WHEN:                Friday, July 25, 2014, 10:30 am

WHERE:             Beach at Great Dunes Park, Jekyll Island, GA

 

Jul
21

Jekyll Island Deer Management

The mission of the Jekyll Island Conservation Plan (JICP) is to “Preserve, maintain, manage, and restore Jekyll Island’s natural communities and species diversity while providing nature-based educational and recreational opportunities to the general public.” Specifically regarding white-tailed deer, the JICP recognizes that deer can “adversely affect long-term conservation goals by preferentially foraging on propagules and saplings of desirable native plant species”. The Jekyll Island Authority Board of Directors met on July 21, 2014 . Recommendations were made to the board about deer management on Jekyll Island.

Click here to see the recommendations.

Jekyll Island Deer Management Issue Paper_7 20 14_V2

Jul
17
woo_poster

Vote for your favorite poster!

There’s a new ingredient added to this year’s Shrimp & Grits: The Wild Georgia Shrimp Festival. For the first time, the poster for this year’s festival will be awarded to that special artist who submits the best artwork determined by the online voting public. Artists from around the region submitted their vision for official Wild Georgia Shrimp Festival poster and Jekyll Island and we are down to the final 5 . Vote now! http://woobox.com/97pmz4

Jul
17

Governor Deal makes one new appointment and one reappointment to JIA Board of Directors

Governor Nathan Deal announced the appointment of William H. Gross to the Jekyll Island State Park Authority. Gross is the owner and president of W.H. Gross Construction. He has worked in light commercial and residential construction for the past 26 years. He is especially interested in historical preservation construction. Gross currently serves on the Southeast Georgia Health System Foundation and is chairman of the Camden County Chamber of Commerce. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Finance from the University of North Florida. He is a lifelong member of First Baptist Church of Kingsland. He and his wife, Renee, have twins. They reside in Kingsland.

“With the appointment of Bill Gross, the Jekyll Island Authority board grows even stronger,” stated Chairman Richard Royal. “I look forward to working with Bill and appreciate the Governor’s support through his appointment of such high-quality individuals to this board that I am proud to chair.”

Governor Deal also announced the reappointment of Robert W. Krueger to the Jekyll Island State Park Authority. Krueger currently serves on the board as Vice Chairman and has been a board member since 2006.  He is President and CEO of ComSouth Corp and serves as treasurer on the executive committee of the Georgia Telecommunications Association. Krueger earned a bachelor’s degree from Mississippi State University and a master’s degree from the University of Georgia. He is a former officer in the U.S. Navy and is an Eagle Scout. He and his wife Carol, have three children and three grandchildren. They reside in Hawkinsville.

 

 

Jul
3

Just By Hand Celebrates 10-year Anniversary this Saturday 1pm- 3pm

The idea struck like lightening – unique, hand-made gift items are always best sellers… why not have a gift shop dedicated to only pieces made by hand by artisans? That was ten years ago when Cheryl and Van Hart opened Just By Hand on Pier Road in the Jekyll Island historic district shops. Since then, Just By Hand has become one of the more popular stores becoming a regular stop for repeat guests.

“We love our customers, and they come back year-after-year to discover what new items we are carrying,” stated Owner Cheryl Hart. “Guests are like family and they always find something new in the store.”

For Cheryl, it is all about the artists. Her passion for retail is matched by her passion for discovering unique works, made by hand by genuine artists who put their heart and soul into their art. Each piece has a story, and Cheryl is sure to relate and represent each piece and each artist to the customer.

Hospitality is also a key part of the business.

“We try to make every guest feel welcome and special,” Cheryl continued. “And we often price below the suggested retail.”

Gift items range from $.35 to $1,400 and include soaps, paintings, jewelry, sculpture and more. Special attention and care is standard, and special orders are no problem.

Find Just By Hand on Pier Road in the Jekyll Island historic district or online at shopjustbyhand.com.

Just By Hand 10-year Anniversary Celebration “Colors of Americana”

Saturday, July 5th, 1pm-3pm

Just By Hand on Pier Road in the Jekyll Island Historic District Shoppes

Join owners Cheryl and Van Hart as they celebrate ten great years of operating a successful gift shop of hand-crafted items. Special for the holiday weekend, “Colors of Americana” art show will feature pieces in red, white and blue. Mixed-media artist Deborah Reed will be on hand to meet, greet, sign and personalize purchased items. Refreshments and free gift with purchase.

 

Jul
1

Beach Water Quality Frequently Asked Questions

These questions and answers have been compiled by the Coastal Resources Division and Coastal Health District. For additional information, please contact the Coastal Health District at 912-262-2342 or 912-644-5217.

Q. Are the beaches closed when there is an advisory?
A. The beaches are not closed. However, the Glynn and Chatham County Health Departments
recommend that you do not swim or wade in the water in the area(s) under advisor y. When an
advisory is issued, it is only for the area(s) specified and does not impact any other beaches on the
island.
Q. Why are the beaches under advisor y?
A. The beach water tested at levels above EPA standards for bacteria that may cause illness. Bacteria and
other types of pollution frequently come from various sources including wildlife, sewage overflows,
storm water runoff, sewage treatment malfunctions, boating wastes, and malfunctioning septic
systems. These types of pollution are often highest after rain.
Q. Can I swim or wade in the water?
A. The Glynn and Chatham County Health Departments recommend that you do not swim or wade in
the water because you are at increased risk of illness. Risk of illness comes from contacting beach
water in several ways including ingesting water while swimming, getting water in the nose, eyes, and
ears, or getting water in an open wound. A person wading in the water may unknowingly subject
themselves to a wound infection. If one has an open wound on the lower legs or feet, it could become
infected even from wading.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed standards for
setting beach advisories. Those standards are based on epidemiological studies and are intended to
keep the risks of contracting an illness from the beach water from becoming unacceptably high. It
should be noted that contracting an illness from contact with beach water during an advisory is not a
certainty.
Q. Is it safe to walk on the beach?
A. Yes. Risk of illness comes from contacting beach water.
Q. Will I get sick if I go in the water?
A. Not necessarily but you are at an increased risk of illness.
Q. What kind of illness?
A. Gastrointestinal, wound infection, respiratory infection, urinary tract infection. The degree of
illnesses may range from minor conditions such as a sore throat, an ear infection, or mild stomach
upset (diarrhea) to more serious conditions. Because our bodies’ own defenses (immune system) help
protect us from many of these types of illnesses, people who may have weakened immune systems
(young children and the elderly) may have a greater chance of getting sick.
Q. Can I eat fish I’ve caugh from a beach that is under advisory?
A. Yes, fish and other seafood caught from the area(s) should be thoroughly washed with fresh water and
thoroughly cooked before eating as should fish or seafood caught from any waters.
Q. Will my dog get sick if he drinks seawater?
A. Don’t allow your dog to drink too much seawater at any time. For dogs, just drinking salt water can
cause diarrhea or vomiting and quickly dehydrate them.
Q. How can I find out if a beach is under advisory or not?
A. You can log on to www.GaHealthyBeaches.org.

Jun
30

Jekyll Island Water Quality Report

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE FROM YOUR WATER DEPARTMENT

Download a copy of the Jekyll Island Water Quality Report here >> 2014 CCR (2)

The Jekyll Island Authority Water Department is pleased to offer you this Water Quality Report for Jekyll Island’s Public Water System I.D. No. 1270028.  This report is a summary of the year 2013 laboratory testing results of Jekyll Island’s drinking water.   The United States Environmental Protection Agency and Georgia Environmental Protection Division have set high standards for the quality of water you use.  These high standards require our water system to analyze over 150 different water quality parameters annually to ensure the quality and safety of the water we deliver to your homes daily.

This is the seventeenth time we have produced this report, and we are proud of the fact that we have never had a permit violation for contaminant levels in the water we supply.  The health and safety of your family will always be our top priority.

Contained within this report is information about the source of your water, the treatment processes we use to treat and sanitize the water supply, and the many tests we performed on your water last year (and some from prior years). Additional information, including conservation measures and source water assessment, have been added as State requirements have mandated. Our staff work diligently to assure that the water delivered to your home meets or surpasses standards set by the State and Federal Governments.

We are continuing our commitment to provide you with clean and safe drinking water.  Please take the time to read this report and if you have any questions or comments on the contents, please call Alan Thurston at (912)-635-4021. We have placed a copy of this report on our web site, http://www.jekyllislandauthority.org/. A copy of the Jekyll Island Water System Wellhead Protection Plan is also available upon request.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling EPA’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activities.  Contaminants that may be present in source water include the following:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPD/CDC, guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risks of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

    JekyllIsland’s water source is the Upper Floridan aquifer and is protected from most of these contaminants because of the depth of the wells (approx. 850 ft.) and the impermeability of the confining layers (various rock strata) above and below it.  However, over pumping of the FloridanAquifer in some coastal areas of the State has caused saltwater intrusion and the problem is a matter of current research and regulatory action.  Due to the permeability of the surface soils in this part of the state, water bearing zones called Surficial Aquifers (above the major confining layers that protect the Brunswick and Floridan aquifers) are vulnerable to contamination. For this reason, the Environmental Protection Division’s Georgia Wellhead Protection Plan for the Jekyll Island Authority has classified Jekyll Island to be a *1“Significant Recharge Area” and to be at a *2 “Higher Susceptibility” to pollution status.

The proximity of our wellheads relative to public roads, telephone poles, electrical transformers, and service roads (dirt roads leading to and from the water plants) theoretically places them at risk in the immediate proximity (10 ft. radius) of the wellheads (spills from vehicles, leakage, improper storage or disposal of chemicals etc). Many private residences (not served by public water systems in GlynnCounty) are at significant risk from surface pollution (as described above) because those wells are generally 180-200 ft deep…drawing water from the surficial aquifers.

Surface water entering the ground through the rock strata at or near “The Fall Line” (Columbus, Macon, and Augusta) feeds and re-charges the Floridan Aquifer water levels. Our water system withdraws water from five Floridan Aquifer wells for our drinking water supply. The raw groundwater is aerated to remove hydrogen sulfide (sulfur taste and odor) and chlorinated for disinfection before being pumped into each of the elevated storage tanks or into the system.  Each of these wells is 750- 850 feet deep.  One well is located on the North end of the Island on Major Horton Road.  Two more are located a short distance South on Bond Road.  The other two wells are located on South Beachview Drive on the South end of the Island.  The two golf-ball and tee shaped water towers #1 & #2 no longer have active wells but are filled from the system with water produced by the other wells and serve as elevated storage during high water demands and fire protection events.  JekyllIsland’s Water System is flexible and can be extended to meet future needs.  Presently we maintain over 40 miles of water mains on the Island.

The Jekyll Island Authority continues to explore and utilize alternate water sources in our conservation efforts.  The golf courses, some hotels, Summer Waves, Soccer Complex, and the Entrance Parkway have begun using the Miocene Aquifer for irrigation. Currently, all possible golf course irrigation is from this source. Recently, the Jekyll Island Authority began allowing the use of shallow residential wells for irrigation through a shallow well permitting system. Alternate source water use will help preserve the Floridan Aquifer, the high quality “drinking water aquifer.”

JekyllIsland Authority Ordinance of 12-20-2010, Sec. 18-15. regulates water use during non-drought conditions.

Water use in non-drought conditions:

Outdoor water use other than exempted activities shall occur only as follows:

(1)    Odd-numbered addresses: outdoor water use is allowed on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

(2)    Even-numbered and unnumbered addresses: outdoor water use is allowed on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

(3)    No Friday Water use.

(b)  Outdoor watering for the purpose of planting, growing, managing or maintaining ground cover, trees, shrubs or other plants may occur only between the hours of 4:00 PM and 10:00 AM.

No outdoor water use is allowed between 10:00AM and 4:00 PM.

The exceptions to these restrictions expected to impact JekyllIsland water users are as follows:

  • Irrigation for a personal food garden
  • Irrigation of newly installed landscapes, commercial or private (In place less than 30 days) (Irrigation under this exception allowed any day of the week for a period of thirty days following installation)
  • Commercial uses including: Retail garden centers, sod, ornamental, fruit, and vegetable growers, Hydro seeding, power washing, construction site re-planting, car washes and other activities essential to daily business

Water may be used at any time under these excepted conditions.

 

Water Conservation

Along with the outdoor water use restrictions, here are a few ways to conserve water usage outside and inside your home.

  • Check your water meter and bill to track your water usage.
  • Locate the leak indicator (a small red triangular shaped dial located on the face of your water meter) that rotates as water passes through the meter. If it moves any at all when everything is turned off in the house and yard. There is a leak somewhere. We have begun installing new Digital magnetic flow meters. The LCD display reads to 100ths of gallons and will easily show leakage by simply observing the display when all water is turned off.
  • Install a master water shut-off valve on the customer side of the meter for maintenance and emergencies. This could save much water and prevent damage to your home in the event of a plumbing leak.
  • Inspect your sprinkler system frequently while in operation for leaks and proper function.  Adjust sprinklers so only your plants are watered…not the side of the house, sidewalk, or street.
  • Install a rain shut-off device on your automatic sprinklers to eliminate unnecessary watering
  • Minimize evaporation by watering only after 4 PM and before 10AM.
  • More plants die from over-watering than from under-watering be sure only to water when necessary.
  • When doing laundry, match the water level to the size of the load.
  • If your toilet was installed prior to 1980, place a toilet dam or bottle filled with water in your tank to cut down of the amount of water used for each flush Or, better still, replace the toilet with a modern water efficient toilet.
  • Make sure your toilet flapper doesn’t stick open after flushing.
  • If your shower can fill a one-gallon bucket in less than 20 seconds, then replace it with a water efficient showerhead.
  • Teach your children to turn the faucets off tightly after each use.
  • The Jekyll Island Authority has issued water conservation tips through the brochure “Every drop Counts” produced by the Department of Community Affairs. Their website is www.dca.stste.ga.us/water conservation.

CountyExtension Offices are also an excellent source of information on water conservation.  In addition, there are many good websites that provide information on water conservation.  Here are a few:

*1 Hydrologic Atlas 18, Most Significant Recharge areas of Georgia, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Atlanta, 1989.

*2 Hydrologic Atlas 20, Ground-Water Pollution Susceptibility Map of Georgia, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Atlanta, 1992.

 

WATER QUALITY DATA

The following tables list all the drinking water contaminants that were detected during the 2013 calendar year.  The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done January 1 – December 31, 2013.  Georgia EPD requires monitoring for certain contaminants less than once each year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year.  

TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THESE TABLES

 

MCLG:  Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: the level of contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLG’s allow for a margin of safety.

MCL:  Maximum Contaminant Level; the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCL’s are set as close to the MCLG’s as feasible using the best available technology (BAT).

AL:  Action Level:  the concentration of a contaminant which, when exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

TT:  Treatment Technique:  a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

N/A: not applicable.  ND: not detected.  ppb: parts per billion ug/l: micrograms per liter ppm: parts per million mg/l: milligrams per liter pci/l: pico curies per liter (A measure of radiation).

Analogies that demonstrate how small these concentrations are:

1 ppm or mg/l is equal to 1 penny in $10,000.00.

1 ppb is equal to 1 penny in $10,000,000.00.

 

INORGANIC CONTAMINANT TABLE

 

 

 

Parameter

 

 

MCL

 

 

MCLG

 

Range of

Detection

 

JekyllIsland

System

 

Sample

Date

 

Acceptable

Yes/No

Typical Source    of Contamination

**

Fluoride, mg/l

4.0

N/A

0.58-0.60

0.60

2013

Yes

Naturally Occurring
 

Sodium, mg/l

*

*

12.0-22.0

13.0

2012

Yes

Naturally Occurring
 

Iron, ppb

*

*

ND

ND

2012

Yes

Naturally Occurring
 

Chlorine Residual, mg/l

4.0

4.0

1.1 -1.6

1.6

2013

Yes

Water Additive used to control microbes
 

 

 

* No MCL or MCLG established

** Fluoride is added to water in some systems for prevention of tooth decay

 

ORGANIC CONTAMINANT TABLE

 

Parameter

MCL

ppb

MCLG

ppb

JekyllIsland Water System

Range of

Detection

Sample Date

Acceptable

Yes/no

Typical Source of Contamination

Total Tri- halomethanes

80.0

0.0

15.9-17.6

N/A

2013

Yes

By-product of Chlorination

Halo-Acetic Acids

60.0

N/A

2.6-2.9

N/A

2013

Yes

By-product of

Chlorination

RADIONUCLIDES

Parameter

MCL

Pci/l

MCLG

Pci/l

JekyllIsland Water System

Range of Detection

Sample Date

Acceptable yes/no

Typical Source of Contamination

Beta Photo Emitters

50*

0.0

ND

N/A

2007

Yes

Naturally Occurring

The MCL for beta particles is 4 millirems/year.  EPA considers 50 Pci/l to be the level of concern for beta particles.

 

LEAD AND COPPER

 

Parameter

MCL

ppb

MCLG

ppb

JekyllIsland Water System

No of sites above Action Levels

Sample Date

Acceptable

Yes/no

Typical Source of Contamination

Lead, ppb

15

0.0

          2.5

0

2013

Yes

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

Copper, ppb

1300

0

        64.0

0

2013

Yes

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

 

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Jekyll Island Water System is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at  http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

 

In addition to the above analyses, JekyllIsland’s Water Laboratory collects and analyzes 3 samples each month from sites equally divided around the island for microbiological contaminants (Total Coliform, Fecal Coliform, and/or E. Coli. Bacteria).  There have been no incidents of contamination of the system water by any of these indicator organisms.

 

The Georgia Environmental Protection Division, through risk assessment and meticulous testing protocol, has granted The Jekyll Island Authority Waivers on testing for the chemicals listed below:  (This means that no harmful levels of these substances were detected as specified in the Georgia Rules for Safe Drinking Water, Rev. 1994.)

 

Cyanide                                               Chlorodane                                         Heptachlor

Heptachlor Epoxide                            Methoxychlor                                     PCB’s

q-BHC (Lindane)                                Endrin                                                 Aldrin

Hexachlorobenzene                            Hexachlorocyclopentadiene               Dieldrin

Asbestos                                             Dioxin                                                Alachlor

Aldicarb Sulfone                                Aldicarb Sulfoxide                             Atrazine

Benzo (A) Pyrene                               Carbofuran                                         Dalapon

Di (2-Ethylhexyl) Adipate                  Dibromochloropropane (DBCP)        Dinoseb

Diquat                                                 Di (2- Ethylhexyl) Phthalate              Endothall

Ethylene Dibromide (EDB)                Glyphosate                                         Lindane

Oxymyl (Vydate)                                Pentachlorophenol                             Picloram

Simazine 2,4-D                                   Toxaphene 2,4,5-TP (Silvex)             2,3,7,8-TCDD

Arsenic

 

We are pleased to report that your community’s drinking water has met or exceeded all safety and quality standards set by the Georgia EPD and the USEPA during the previous year and in previous years.  This 2013 Water Quality Report is inclusive of all contaminants detected in the system’s drinking water supply during the 2013 calendar year unless otherwise noted.  We are committed to provide consumers with safe, dependable tap water on a year-round basis.

Over the years, the Jekyll Island Water and Wastewater departments have received numerous awards for outstanding operations. Most recently, the Water Department received the “2008 Plant of the Year Award” in our size category from Georgia Association of Water Professionals. In addition, the Water system has received 10-year platinum award for continuous permit compliance.

Jun
25

Spend 4th of July on Jekyll Island

Celebrate on Jekyll Island! The Jekyll Island Authority will host a traditional fireworks display on its public beach on Friday, July 4th in celebration of the Independence Day holiday.

The July 4th fireworks display will begin after sundown and is best viewed from Great Dunes Park including the adjacent beach just north of the Jekyll Island Convention Center. The Jekyll Island Authority invites guests to come to the island for the 4th of July fireworks display, but be aware that traffic may be heavier than normal due to the holiday. A $6 per vehicle daily parking fee is required for entry onto Jekyll Island. Parking passes are available for purchase online at jekyllisland.com.

The Georgia State Patrol will increase its presence on Jekyll Island all day Friday, and likewise will be assisted on Highway 17 by Glynn County Police as guests are exiting the Island after the fireworks show. Jekyll Island Authority staff will also be stationed at Great Dunes Park to ensure that the public restrooms and gathering spaces are kept clean and well-stocked.

Who: Jekyll Island Authority

What: 4th of July Fireworks Display

When: After dark, Friday, July 4th, 2014

Where: Great Dunes Park, 101 N. Beachview Drive, Jekyll Island, Georgia 31527

How: A $6 per vehicle parking fee is required for entry onto Jekyll Island.

For more information about the fireworks show and other activities on Jekyll Island, please call the Jekyll Island Guest Information Center at 912.635.3636 or visit jekyllisland.com.

Jun
9

4-H Tidelands Nature Center Summer Programs Excite!

While visiting Jekyll Island this Summer, be sure to check out fun filled family oriented programs. 4-H Tidelands offers great Summer time learning experiences for all ages. Children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian to participate (except for day camp). Reservations are required.  912-635-5032. Please click here to read all about the Summer programs!

http://www.tidelands4h.org/documents/Tidelands2014summerprogramsdescriptions2last.pdf

From Our Blog

Jul
22

Team Sea Watch Cooks Again!

Tom Kent and Pat Cochran have been cooking together since they were in college over 40 years ago.  Many dishes have been prepared while on vacations and getaways over the years and some were created on sailboats off the coast of British Columbia, Maine, and in the Virgin Islands.  Team Sea Watch entered Jekyll Shrimp [...]

Jul
21

Sea Turtle Release this Friday at 10:30 a.m.

 

 Public Invited to Attend! Join Us!

WHO:                   Jekyll Island Authority – Georgia Sea Turtle Center

WHAT:                Sea Turtle Release

WHEN:                Friday, July 25, 2014, 10:30 am

WHERE:             Beach at Great Dunes Park, Jekyll Island, GA

 

From Our Blog

Expert Bloggers

What better way to educate yourself on the beauty and opportunities for fun on Jekyll Island than from one of our knowledgeable staff members. Read Their Insights